Plenary Speakers

The International Conference on the Constructed Environment will feature plenary sessions by some of the world’s leading thinkers and innovators in the field, as well as numerous parallel presentations by researchers and practitioners.

Kathryn H. Anthony
René Davids
Cristiano Lippa
David Mayernik
Jeffery S. Poss

Garden Conversation Sessions

Plenary Speakers will make formal 30-minute presentations. They will also participate in 60-minute Garden Conversations – unstructured sessions that allow delegates a chance to meet the speakers and talk with them informally about the issues arising from their presentation.

Please return to this page for regular updates.


The Speakers

Kathryn H. Anthony

At the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign’s School of Architecture Kathryn H. Anthony is its longest serving female faculty member, its only female Full Professor, the first woman to have served as Chair of the Design Program Faculty and as Chair of the Building Research Council. She holds the lifetime title of Distinguished Professor from the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA). She received national awards from the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the ACSA, and the Environmental Design Research Association (EDRA). She holds a Ph.D. in architecture and a bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of California at Berkeley.

The author of Designing for Diversity: Gender, Race, and Ethnicity in the Architectural Profession (2001, 2008), Design Juries on Trial: The Renaissance of the Design Studio (1991)and over 100 publications, Dr. Anthony has served as a spokesperson about gender issues in architecture on ABC World News with Diane Sawyer, National Public Radio (NPR), The Chicago Tribune, The Economist, The Los Angeles Times, Time.com, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, and elsewhere. The New York Times (April 13, 2009) featured her words as the ‘Quotation of the Day’.

Dr. Anthony testified before the US House of Representatives Committee on Oversight and Government Reform in Washington, DC on May 12, 2010 in support of H.R. 4869, The Bipartisan Restroom Gender Parity in Federal Buildings Act. Her testimony and publications on gender and family issues in public restrooms are entered into the US Congressional Record. A former Chair of the Chancellor’s Committee on the Status of Women, she is currently Co-Chair of the Provost’s Gender Equity Council, spearheading a movement to incorporate gender equity issues into the design review process for new buildings and major renovations on campus. Her course on gender and race in contemporary architecture has been taught for almost 20 years.

Throughout her academic career, Dr. Anthony has served as a catalyst to challenge and change architectural education and practice, inspiring faculty to create more humane learning environments, architects to create more humane working environments, and students to empower themselves.Her teaching, research, writing, and service have educated hundreds of architecture students, faculty, and practitioners—and the public—about the critical importance of designing for diversity and designing spaces for people.


René Davids

René Davids, FAIA (born Santiago, Chile) received his bachelor of architecture degree from the Universidad de Chile and on a British Council Fellowship, a master’s degree in environmental design from the Royal College of Art in London. He headed a Diploma School Unit at the Architectural Association School for eight years and also taught at the Royal College of Art and the Macintosh School in Glasgow. Before becoming Professor of Architecture and Urban Design at the UC Berkeley School of Architecture, he taught architecture at the University of California, San Diego, the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile in Santiago and the University of New Mexico. René Davids is Fellow of the American Institute of Architects and a member of the Colegio de Arquitectos de Chile. He was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship and a Progressive Architecture Award for research on the hillside elevators of Valparaíso, Chile and is currently working on a book that examines the relationship between technology, topography and urbanism in selected North and South American cities. He received with Christine Killory a Graham Foundation Fellowship for As Built: Theory of Practice, a continuing biannual series of publications on technical and material innovation in architecture by Princeton Architectural Press. Davids is also a principal of Davids Killory Architecture a firm that has received national and international recognition for design: AIA National Honor Awards for Sunrise Place, Daybreak Grove, and Observatory House, Federal Design Awards for Sunrise Place and Daybreak Grove and Progressive Architecture Awards for Daybreak Grove and Sunrise Place, as well as numerous other wards and the work of the firm has been published widely.


Cristiano Lippa

pic1Cristiano Lippa is an architect researching on issues concerning the perception of architectural and urban space in relation with tectonic structures. He has graduated at the University of Roma Tre in 2004 with a thesis called “Archaeological Underground Museum in Piazza di Porta Maggiore in Rome”, winning project of the XV International Symposium of Urban Culture at the University of Camerino in Italy. In 2004 he has founded the architectural firm SMLarchitects, a platform of young designers spread throughout the world, using the whole networking and digital technologies currently available, working together on the same projects at the same time. The main goal is to investigate new potentialities from a combination of different personal experiences and local spacial perceptions in order to innovative design language.

He has worked in architectural competitions and projects, earning recognitions and prices. His works includes public buildings, public open spaces as well as major commissions such as several masterplans in Rome. He has collaborated in research programs at the LAPEX (Laboratory for Studies on Architecture in Extra European Countries) of the Department of Architecture of University La Sapienza of Rome. He was invited to participate to the International Design Workshop “Nombei Yokocho”, which took place at The University of Tokyo in November 2006. This on-site experience, which involved working with other Japanese designers, was extremely important in order to develop his architectural knowledge in a global way. At the Department of Architecture of University La Sapienza of Rome he has graduated PhD in 2008 with a dissertation called “Oku and the Japanese Sense of Space”. From 2009 he is a PhD candidate in Kengo Kuma Laboratory of University of Tokyo and he is collaborating at Kengo Kuma & Associates Office in Tokyo.


David Mayernik

David Mayernik is an Associate Professor with the School of Architecture at the University of Notre Dame: he is an urban designer, architect, artist, and writer who has won numerous awards and competitions, including the Gabriel Prize for research in France, the Steedman Competition Fellowship to the American Academy in Rome, and the International Competition for the Minnesota State Capitol Grounds (with partner Thomas Norman Rajkovich); that project won an Arthur Ross Award. He was named in 1995 to the decennial list of the top 40 architects in the United States under 40 years old. Since 1996 he has been the campus planner and architect for the TASIS schools in Lugano, Switzerland and Surrey, England. His M. Crist Fleming Library at TASIS Switzerland won a 2005 Palladio Award. David Mayernik is also a painter in oil, buon fresco and watercolor, and has painted frescoes for his own buildings in Switzerland and for churches there and in Italy. His drawings have been exhibited internationally, and he has been featured twice in American Artist magazine. David Mayernik’s book, Timeless Cities: An Architect’s Reflections on Renaissance Italy, was published by Westview Press (Icon Editions) in 2003 (paperback 2005). His essay on Giulio Romano’s architecture and frescoes at the Palazzo Te was published in Aeolian Winds and the Spirit in Renaissance Architecture (Routledge, 2006). His chapter in the recent Green Living (Rizzoli) discusses the traditional relationship of the body and buildings, and his work for TASIS is featured in New Palladians (Artmedia Press). He is the co-editor with Taeho Paik of the online Humanist Art Review (www.humanistart.net). Mayernik is a Fellow of the American Academy in Rome and the RSA (Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, & Commerce).


Jeffery S. Poss

Jeffery S. Poss FAIA is a Professor in the University of Illinois School of Architecture. He creates places of commemoration, introspection, and meaning that evoke the human spirit‐‐public places that bring people together, or conversely, private spaces that allow people to find refuge in quiet contemplation. Through his design work Professor Poss strives to articulate values and symbols that express the highest aspirations of our society: projects that act as inspirational models of design and practice both to the students under his tutelage and the people who use them. The intention is to uncover the deeply rooted qualities of specific places, while also engaging universal symbols and archetypal meanings that transcend those places.